Texas Causes of Action & Affirmative Defenses

Texas Causes of Action & Affirmative Defenses

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Monday, November 2, 2009

SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE REMEDY (breach of contract)

   
WHEN IS A PLAINTIFF ENTITLED TO SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE AS A REMEDY? 

The equitable remedy of specific performance may be awarded upon a showing of a breach of contract. Stafford v. S. Vanity Magazine, Inc., 231 S.W.3d 530, 535 (Tex. App.—Dallas 2007, pet. denied).
 
ELEMENTS REQUIRED FOR AWARD OF SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE

However, a party seeking specific performance must plead and prove (1) compliance with the contract including tender of performance unless excused by the opposing party's breach or repudiation and (2) the readiness, willingness, and ability to perform at relevant times. DiGiuseppe v. Lawler, 269 S.W.3d 588, 593-94, 601 (Tex. 2008); see also 17090 Parkway, Ltd. v. McDavid, 80 S.W.3d 252, 258 (Tex. App.—Dallas 2002, pet. denied). It is required that both elements be proved prior to an award of specific performance unless the requirement of tender is excused. DiGiuseppe, 269 S.W.3d at 599.

SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE IN CONTEXT OF SALE OF REAL ESTATE 

"Generally speaking, it is a prerequisite to the equitable remedy of specific performance that the buyer of land shall have made an actual tender of the purchase price . . . [unless] actual tender would have been a useless act . . . ." DiGiuseppe, 269 S.W.3d at 594 (citing Wilson v. Klein, 715 S.W.2d 814, 822 (Tex. App.—Austin 1986, writ ref'd n.r.e.). See also McMillan v. Smith, 363 S.W.2d 437, 442-43 (Tex. 1962). The exception to the general rule that actual tender of performance is a prerequisite to obtaining specific performance is grounded in the notion that actual pre-suit tender of performance should be excused when it would be a "useless act, an idle ceremony, or wholly nugatory." DiGiuseppe, 269 S.W.3d at 594; Wilson, 715 S. W.2d at 822. The issue of whether a party to a contract is "ready, willing, and able" to perform presents a question of fact, not a question of law. See DiGiuseppe, 269 S.W.3d at 596. See also Holt v. Elliott Indus., Inc., 711 S.W.2d 435, 437 (Tex. App.—Fort Worth 1986, no writ). Additionally, whether a plaintiff would have performed his contractual obligations when they came due but for the defendant’s breach or repudiation of the contract is also a question of fact. DiGiuseppe, 269 S.W.3d at 600.


SOURCE: 10-07-00362-CV (Waco Court of Appeals) (10/28/09)